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Conventional Herbs

ARUGULA LARGE LEAF

Details

History

Native to Mediterranean region, arugula blossoms and leaves have long been. a popular ingredient in the cuisines of Italy, Morocco, Portugal and Turkey.  Arugula was brought to AMERICA BY British colonists but was not until the 1990’S that arugula became known as a popular culinary ingredient in the United States.

Culinary use

In the culinary world arugula is used as an herb, a salad green and even a leaf vegetable, making it a versatile ingredient in the kitchen. It can be used both raw and cooked, though cooked, though will give the leaves a milder flavor.

Properties

Arugula is a nutrient rich leafy green providing vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, riboflavin, copper, iron, zinc, folate and potassium. Cruciferous vegetable such as arugula are also high in antioxidant phytochemicals.

Did you know?

People say Arugula is rich in sulfur containing compounds known as glycosylates which have been shown to have detoxifying properties and may be beneficial in the prevention of certain types of cancer.

BASIL

Details

History

Basil is native to Africa, Asian and the Pacific Islands. From there it made its way to Europe and India via the Middle East in the sixteenth century and eventually to America in the seventeenth century.

Culinary use

Basil is an herb that can be used whole, chopped, and turned in to a paste or dried. Commonly used raw when fresh. Basil can be added to bread or salad. Serve chopped atop pizza, pasta, chicken and fish.

Properties

Basil has high level of vitamin K. It has a moderate of beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant which converts to vitamin A when digested.

Did you know?

People say women sometimes use basil before and after childbirth to promote blood circulation, and also to start the flow of breast milk. They say basil is good for stomach spasms, loss of appetite, intestinal gas, kidney conditions, fluid retention, head colds,  warts, and worm infections.

BAY LEAVES

Details

History

Although the bay leaf was not introduced to England until the sixteenth century, it has been around since ancient Greek and Roman times. Also, the bay leaf was held in such high hopes that victors of battle, sport and study were crowned with garlands of laurel, as a symbol of their success.

Culinary use

Bay leaves may also be crushed or ground before cooking. Crushed bay leaves impact more fragrance than whole leaves, but are more difficult to remove, and thus they are often in a muslin bag or tea infuser. They are typically used to season long- cooking dishes like soup, stews, and braises, but it can also enhance the flavor of quicker cooking dishes like risotto, pasta sauce, or even a simple pot of rice.

Properties

Bay leaves often us a healthy dose of vitamins A, C, magnesium, calcium, manganese, potassium, and iron.

Did you know?

People say Bay leaves soothe body aches and ease joint pain from arthritis. They say making a decoction of 4-5 bay leaves in a liter of water and add to bathwater to relive sore muscles and rejuvenate the body.

CHERVIL

Details

History

Chervil is native to Europe and Asia but is naturalized in parts of eastern North America. The Romans, who brought it to Brittain, cooked and ate both the foliage and the skinny, white taproots.

Culinary Use

Chervil is used to season poultry, seafood, young spring vegetables (such as carrots), soups, and sauces.

Properties

The herb is also rich in many antioxidant vitamins, including vitamin-A, vitamin-C, vitamin-E, and phenolic antioxidants like zeaxanthin, lutein, and cryptoxanthin.

Did you know?

Chervil has had various uses in folk medicine. It was claimed to be useful as a digestive aid, for lowering high blood pressure, and infused with vinegar, for hiccups.

Chives

Details

History

Chives are native to the Balkans, an area that includes modern day Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, and parts of southwestern Russia. Over the Centuries, the herb has become naturalized throughout most of Europe and can be found as far north as Britain and as far as east as Japan. The plants grow from bulbs, which were likely brought to the United States with colonists from Europe.

Culinary use

In terms of culinary appeal, the flavor of chives is considerably milder than onion or garlic. The herb is used fresh or died (as well as the flowers) to flavor vinegars, often in combination with other herbs. Dried chives are excellent addition to soups and salads, as well as dips soft cheeses and herbal butters.

Properties

Chives contain vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and folic acid, sulfur, and iron.

Did you know?

People say the nutrients in chives may offer a number of health benefits, including prevention of cancer and mood enhancement.

CHOCOLATE MINT

Details

History

Mint hybrids commonly occur throughout the Mentha genus and have origins in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Culinary Use

Chocolate mint is as chocolaty, minty and scrumptious as it sounds. You can bake it in cakes, add sprigs to mojitos, and even use it in your beauty recipes.

Properties

Chocolate mint is rich in vitamins A and C as well as trace amounts of manganese.

Did you know?

The leaves may be used in teas to help with minor ailments and digestive disorders.

Cilantro

Details

History

No one is quite sure where Cilantro originated, but it is thought by many to be from the Mediterranean region of Europe. No one is absolutely certain, but it appears that cilantro has been used for at least 5000 years. The seeds, also known as coriander, have even been found in ancient Egyptian tombs.

Culinary use

Always use cilantro fresh, never dried or frozen. In uncooked salsas, it is tossed with the other chopped ingredients; in cooked salsas, it is most often added as a freshly chopped garnish. It’s added to most cooked foods toward the end of cooking to preserve its color, flavor, and texture.

Properties

Health benefits of cilantro leaves (coriander) Cilantro herb is very low in calories and contains no cholesterol. However, its deep-green leaves possess good amounts of antioxidants, essential oils, vitamins, and dietary fiber, which may help reduce LDL or “bad cholesterol” levels in the blood

Did you know?

People say that cilantro (coriander) Like many fruits and vegetables, cilantro is a good source of antioxidants. … Its potential health benefits include anticancer effects and improvements in skin health. One-fourth of a cup of cilantro contains 5 percent of the daily value of vitamin A

Curly Parsley

Details

History

The botanical name Petroselinum comes from the Greek word for stone, which is petro, given to parsley because it was found growing on rocky hillsides in Greece. Although the Ancient Greeks did not use parsley in cooking, it was revered as a symbol of oblivion and death and as a funeral herb.

Culinary use

Used to perk up dishes with its fresh green flavor and color, parsley can be much more than a garnish. The two main cultivars of this herb are curly parsley (Petroselinum crispum) with ruffled leaves and Italian parsley (Petroselinum crispum neapolitanum) with flat leaves.

Properties

Despite often being relegated to garnish status, Parsley is nutrient-rich and contains minerals that are beneficial for good health. Parsley contains vitamins A, B, C and K, along with minerals potassium, iron, and copper. It is also a good source of folate. The herb contains volatile (or essential) oils that contain compounds such as limonene, eugenol, and myristicin, which give the herb its unique aroma as well as antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties. t alsIo contains flavonoids like apigenin and luteolin, which boost the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits of Parsley. Parsley is used as a digestive aid and pallet cleanser.

Did you know?

People say curly parsley also contains flavonoids like apigenin and luteolin, which boost the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits of Parsley. Parsley is used as a digestive aid and pallet cleanser.

Curry Leaves

Details

History

The curry leaf tree is native to India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and the Andaman Islands .

Culinary Use

In Indian cuisine, curry leaves are extensively used in everyday cooking. Tadka/tempering is considered incomplete without spluttered curry leaves. And any Indian curry-gravy or dry, used tadka/tempering to add to the appeal of the meal.

Properties

The main nutrients found in curry leaves are carbohydrates, energy, fiber, calcium, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, copper and minerals. It also contains various vitamins like nicotinic acid and vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B and vitamin E.

Did you Know?

Curry leaves can help in treating dysentery, constipation and diarrhea. They are good for diabetics,  eyesight and reduce stress.

Dill

Details

History

Centuries old, dill is native to southern Russia, western Africa and the Mediterranean region. Dill is short-lived and flowers easily spreading its seeds far and wide. Wild varieties of dill are widespread in the Mediterranean, Asia and North America.

Culinary use

Both the seeds and leaves are used for seasoning. It is also a good source of vitamins A and C. Dill loses much of its flavor when cooked, which is why it works particularly well as a garnish. Dill has become an essential ingredient in many pickling recipes, specifically for kosher dill pickles.

Properties

Dill has a significant amount od vitamin A and C, as well as trace amount of folate ion, and manganese.

Did you know?

People say that dill may help reduce Menstrual Cramps also can help reduce Depression.

EDIBLE FLOWERS CONFETTI

Details

History

This beautifully illustrated, delightful book is one in the long-standing series ‘Edible,’ which focuses on the history of the consumption of specific foods. Flowers and other parts of plants have been used with foods in many ancient cultures—the Chinese, Greeks, and Romans incorporated flowers into food.

Culinary use

From decorating a log of goat cheese with pansies to infusing a cocktail with a nasturtium syrup, there is no shortage of ways to put the petal to the metal.

Properties

The benefits of eating flowers. Flowers, especially those with deeper colors, are very high in antioxidants. They also contain Vitamins A, C and E. Some even have Vitamin D. Others contain beta-carotene. And some even have pollen in them that when eaten, can lessen allergy attacks.

Did you know?

People say edible flowers have a sweet, spicy flavor similar to watercress. … Pansy (Viola X Wittrock Ana) – Pansies have a slightly sweet green or grassy flavor. If you eat only the petals, the flavor is extremely mild, but if you eat the whole flower, there is a winter, green overtone.

Epazote

Details

History

It also illuminates the origin of the English common name, “wormseed”. Mexican tea is a name that was popularized due to the plant’s popular use throughout Mexico as a curative infusion. Epazote originated in the tropical belt of Central America, and in Central and Southern Mexico.

Culinary use

Culinary Uses of Epazote. The herb is used almost exclusively in traditional Mexican and Guatemalan cuisines, where both the fresh leaves and tender stems are used. … The flavor compounds in epazote do not stand up to heat for a long time, so the herb is added to dishes near the end of cooking.

Properties

Epazote Nutrition Facts. Epazote contains a wide range of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A, vitamin B (specifically folic acid), and vitamin C, as well as calcium, manganese, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, and zinc. It also contains dietary fiber and a small amount of protein.

Did you know?

People say epazote eaten raw, it is somewhere between pine, citrus and turpentine (that is to say: weird but good). I love using it not just in beans, but also in salads, quesadillas, sautéed vegetables, salsas, guacamole and, of course, tacos.

Hoja Santa

Details

History

Hoja Santa (Piper auritum) is an aromatic herb with a large, heart-shaped, velvety leaf which grows in the tropics of Latin America. The name hoja Santa means “sacred leaf” in Spanish, but it goes by other monikers: acuyo, yerba Santa, hierba Santa, Mexican pepper leaf, root beer plant, and sacred pepper.

Culinary use

Fresh Hoja Santa leaves are sometimes used to wrap and flavor artisanal cheeses and to wrap tamales, meats, and fish for steaming or baking. The dried leaves can also be used as a seasoning, though fresh Hoja Santa is much more flavorful and preferred for most uses.

Properties

Hoja Santa contains an essential oil comprised of safrole, a natural compound that was used to flavor root beer and root beer-flavored confections until it was banned in the 1960s. This natural compound, along with other naturally occurring phytochemicals and substances in Hoja Santa, lends itself to ancient folk remedies still used in Mexico today. The leaf is used as a tonic to aid in digestion and to relieve colic.

Did you know?

People say in Central Mexico, Hoja Santa leaves are used to flavor a chocolate drink known as “Aztecs chocolate.” In the Mexican states of Tabasco and Yucatan, the leaf is used to make a green liquor called Verdín.

Italian Parsley

Details

History

Italian parsley is native to the Mediterranean region of southern Europe, through botanist Carl Linnaeus believed it to be specifically the large island of Sardinia off the coast of Italy and southern France. Cultivated for more than 2000 years, Parsley was used for centuries as a medicinal herb before it was consumed as a seasoning.

Culinary use

Using Parsley in The Kitchen: Italian flat parsley has the flavor, and is used to flavor soups, sauces, stew, and adds a zesty flavor to salads. It melds well with seafood, as well as grilled or roasted meats.

Properties

Compounds in Italian parsleys essential oils like limonene, eugenol and myristicin give the herb its aroma as well as antifungal, antiseptic, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Did you know?

People say that parsley has important health benefits includes preventing halitosis, fighting skin cancer, fighting diabetes, promoting bone health, boosting immune system, serving as a natural antibiotic, keeping the heart healthy and detoxifying the body.

KAFFIR LIME LEAVES

Details

History

Its fruit and leaves are used in Southeast Asian cuisine and its essential oil is used in perfumery. Although the precise origin is uncertain, wild limes are believed to have first grown in Indonesia or Southeast Asia, and then were transported to the Mediterranean region and north Africa around 1000 CE.

Culinary use

The leaves are widely used in Thai, Lao, Vietnamese and Indonesian cuisine. Particularly, in Vietnamese cuisine leaves are used to add fragrance to chicken dishes and to decrease the pungent odor when steaming snails. The leaves should be used whole when simmering in soups and curries and may be shredded for use in fish cakes or similar dishes. Fresh, tender young leaves are the preferred choice for salads.

Properties

A blast of important vitamins and minerals. Similar to other citrus fruits, lime and lime leaves offers plethora of vitamins and minerals, including potassium. Potassium is important for maintaining nerve function and healthy blood pressure levels.

Did you know?

Kaffir lime leaves include its ability to promote oral health, detoxify the blood, boost skin health, improve digestion, lower inflammation, aid the immune system, reduce stress, and improve the health of the hair.People say lime leaves offers a plethora of vitamins and minerals, including potassium. Potassium is important for maintaining nerve function and healthy blood pressure levels. The fruit is also linked to antioxidants and bioflavonoids that researchers believe could lower the likelihood of cancer.

Lavender Leaf

Details

History

Lavender is native to the Mediterranean region: from Spain, through the south of France, Italy, Truck, Greece, and Northern Africa. Lavender was originally identified and classified by Carl Linnaeus as Lavandula officinalis, the “officinalis” epithet reflects the established medicinal and culinary qualities of the herb.

Culinary use

Lavender Flowers are most commonly used in dessert recipes, but as you progress in cooking with lavender, you will discover it is also an outstanding addition to savory recipes. Like rosemary, lavender can add a robust flavor to roasted meats and is especially good for lamb.

Properties

Lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, which can help to heal minor burns and bug bites. Research suggests that it may be useful for treating anxiety, insomnia, depression, and restlessness.

Did you know?

People sat the of lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, which can help to heal minor burns and bug bites. In addition to helping with digestive problems, lavender is used to help relieve pain from headaches, sprains, toothaches, and sores.

LEMON BALM

Details

History

Native to South Europe, especially in mountainous situations, but is naturalized in moderate regions throughout the world, lemon balm is a common garden herb. It is an easily cultivated, non-discriminated plant that ca be grown from seed, self-seeding or cutting in virtually any soil.

Culinary use

Use lemon balm in place of lemon peel in recipes and to flavor soups, sauces, vinegars and seafood. Or add it to your favorite sugar cookie dough for a pretty tea cookie. I especially like to toss a few fresh leaves into a salad or a bowl of mixed fresh fruit or to use it in a vinaigrette for marinades and salads.

Properties

Often said to help ease stress and anxiety, lemon balm contains rosmarinic acid (a chemical compound with antioxidant properties). The herb is also used for insomnia, cold sores, high cholesterol, genital herpes, indigestion, and heartburn.

Did you know?

People say Lemon balm is a perennial herb from the mint family. The leaves, which have a mild lemon aroma, are used to make medicine. Lemon balm is used alone or as part of various multi-herb combination products. … Many people believe lemon balm has calming effects, so they take it for anxiety, sleep problems, and restlessness.

Lemon Basil

Details

History

Lemon Basil is highly cultivated throughout southern Asian and northeastern Africa, where it is believed to have originated as a hybrid between Ocimum americium and Ocimum basilicum. It was brought to the Americas sometime during the 17th century.

Culinary use

Lemon basil is the only basil used much in Indonesian cuisine, where it is called kemangi. It is often eaten raw with salad or leap (raw vegetables) and accompanied by sambal. Lemon basil is often used to season certain Indonesian dishes, such as curries, soup, stew and steamed or grilled dishes.

Properties

Lemon basil has moderate levels of beta-carotene and high levels of vitamin K, which are renowned for their anti-inflammatory properties. It is a good source of manganese, copper and vitamin C, and contains calcium, folate, iron and magnesium, all of which are vital for proper body function.

Did you know?

People say basil provides protection at the cellular level, anti-inflammatory effects and nutrients essential for cardiovascular health.

Lemon Grass

Details

History

Lemon grass is a member of the sugar cane family and native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World and Oceania lemongrass is grown commercially within the United States in California and Florida.

Culinary use

A tart citrus like flavor with notes of pepper. In cooking it is prized for its lemon flavor which is similar to lemon zest due to the same high central levels it shares with lemon rind. Lemongrass is used fresh or dried to flavor curries, stir-fries, pickles, soups, stews and salads.

Properties

Lemongrass is a plant. The leaves and the oil are used to make medicine. Lemongrass is used for treating digestive tract spasms, stomachache, high blood pressure, convulsions, pain, vomiting, cough, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion. It is also used to kill germs and as a mild astringent.

Did you know?

People say Lemongrass is used for treating digestive tract spasms, stomachache, high blood pressure, convulsions, pain, vomiting, cough, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion. … For example, lemongrass leaves are commonly used as “lemon” flavoring in herbal teas.

Lemon Thyme

Details

History

Lemons entered Europe near southern Italy no later than the second century AD, during the time of Ancient Rome. However, they were not widely cultivated. They were later introduced to Persia and then to Iraq and Egypt around 700 AD.

Culinary use

Lemon thyme is best used fresh. Chop lemon thyme leaves just before use and add at the very end of the cooking process before they lose flavor and color. Lemon thyme may be added to poultry, seafood, vegetable, marinades, stews, soups, sauces and stuffing while fresh sprigs of this herb make a lovely garnish.

Properties

Thyme is packed with minerals that are vital for optimum health. Its leaves are excellent sources of potassium, calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium and selenium. Potassium, being an important component of cells and body fluids, controls heart rate and blood pressure.

Did you know?

People say the flowers, leaves, and oil of thyme have been used to treat bedwetting, diarrhea, stomach ache, arthritis, colic, sore throat, cough, including whooping cough, bronchitis, flatulence, and as a diuretic, to increase urination.

Lemon Verbena

Details

History

Lemon Verbena is a native to Argentina and Chile. It was brought to Europe on the 17th Century by Spanish explores, and later naturalized in temperate climates throughout the world. The plant thrives in hot climates with full sun so as to develop to most oil-rich leaves.

Culinary use

The large Lemon Verbena leaves should be used for cooked preparations, such as in marinades or infusing oils and syrups. Use Lemon Verbena to flavor jellies, fruit glazes, crème brule, ice cream, sodas and teas.

Properties

Lemon Verbena health benefits includes promoting digestion, relieving nasal congestion, supporting psychological health, boosting immune system, improving skin condition, fighting inflammation, promoting weight loss, reducing fever, and preventing muscle damage.

Did you know?

People say lemon verbena is good for stomachic and therefore good for relieving indigestion, heartburn, and for tonifying the digestive tract. It is also great for soothing anxiety and as a sedative it is helpful in insomnia. Lemon verbena leaves can be made into a delicious and refreshing tea.

Manzanilla (Chamomile)

Details

History

Chamomile history begins in ancient Egypt, where it was first mentioned as a cure for fever, often called the “ague”. … The Romans used chamomile to flavor drinks and in incense, as well as a medicinal herb.  In Spain the flower is called “manzanilla” (also meaning “little apple”).

Culinary use

Leaves may be chopped up, stirred into sour cream or butter and used with baked potatoes. You can use the fresh flowers as a garnish or in salads.  Chamomile tea is one of the most popular herbal teas.

Properties

There is not caffeine in chamomile tea. It contains vitamins and minerals in small amounts. It consists of vitamin A, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, manganese, and sodium.

Did you know?

During the Middle Ages, chamomile was commonly grown as a kitchen herb and sweet-smelling groundcover to help mask the consequences of poor sanitation at the time. Similarly, chamomile was a popular strewing herb that was scattered on the floorboards of homes, churches and other public places.

Marjoram

Details

History

Marjoram is a perennial herb. It is believed that marjoram originally came from the Mediterranean region and Anatolia (Asia Minor) and has been used since ancient times. The ancient Greeks used this as a natural treatment for many ailments. They believed it helped heal from poison, convulsions and edema.

Culinary use

Marjoram is popular in Mediterranean and North American cookery. Add to vegetables, tomato-based dishes, stuffing’s, forcemeats, sausages, preserved meats, game, poultry and pulses. Chop the leaves, but do not use the stems; add at the end of the cooking time.

Properties

Marjoram is a good source of vitamin K, an essential vitamin for normal blood clotting. Heavy bleeding is among the several factors that cause anemia. Likewise, marjoram is also an excellent source of iron, another essential nutrient for the production of red blood cells.

Did you know?

People say marjoram tea can help alleviate common digestive disorders such as flatulence, constipation, diarrhea and stomach cramps. Marjoram contains various compounds that have effective antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties.

MICRO HERBS

Details

History

Micro Rainbow Mix was created during the 1990s-2000s in California as a part of the growing microgreen and Petite Green movement.

Culinary Use

They are most commonly served fresh as a garnish and can be used in both appetizers and main dishes. They can also be sprinkled on top of meat, salads, roasted vegetables, placed in sandwiches, and served over soup, stew, curry, or stir-fry.

Properties

Micro Rainbow Mix contains vitamins A, C, and E, calcium, and potassium.

Did you know?

Microgreens are superior in nutritional value than the mature plants.

Mint

Details

History

Known to have originated in Asia and the Mediterranean region, mint has been known for its many benefits throughout history. Greeks used to clean their banqueting tables with the herb and added it to their baths to stimulate their bodies, whilst Romans used it in sauces, as an aid to digestion and as a mouth freshener.

Culinary use

Mint is often added to drinks to create an interesting flavor and for its health benefits. Mint, especially spearmint and peppermint, is used in tea because of its ability to ease upset stomachs. Mint can be added to water for its refreshing qualities, and it is added to alcoholic beverages such as mojitos.

Properties

Mint is thought to increase bile secretion and encourage bile flow, which helps to speed and ease digestion (and which may also support healthy cholesterol levels). Peppermint is also thought to relieve pain and discomfort from gas and bloating. Peppermint tea is a common home remedy for flatulence.

Did you know?

People say Mint is a calming and soothing herb that has been used for thousands of years to aid with upset stomach or indigestion. Mint is thought to increase bile secretion and encourage bile flow, which helps to speed and ease digestion (and which may also support healthy cholesterol levels).

MIXED EDIBLE FLOWERS

Details

History

This beautifully illustrated, delightful book is one in the long-standing series ‘Edible,’ which focuses on the history of the consumption of specific foods. Flowers and other parts of plants have been used with foods in many ancient cultures—the Chinese, Greeks, and Romans incorporated flowers into food.

Culinary use

From decorating a log of goat cheese with pansies to infusing a cocktail with a nasturtium syrup, there is no shortage of ways to put the petal to the metal.

Properties

The benefits of eating flowers. Flowers, especially those with deeper colors, are very high in antioxidants. They also contain Vitamins A, C and E. Some even have Vitamin D. Others contain beta-carotene. And some even have pollen in them that when eaten, can lessen allergy attacks.

Did you know?

People say edible flowers have a sweet, spicy flavor similar to watercress. … Pansy (Viola X Wittrock Ana) – Pansies have a slightly sweet green or grassy flavor. If you eat only the petals, the flavor is extremely mild, but if you eat the whole flower, there is a winter, green overtone.

Moringa

Details

History

The history of the Moringa tree begins on the Indian subcontinent around 2000 BCE. … Today, Moringa is cultivated around the world, primarily in poorer regions with harsh climates where the many uses for Moringa are needed most—places like Ethiopia, Haiti, Ghana, Honduras, Indonesia and Uganda

Culinary

Moringa is an amazing plant and most of its parts, including the leaves, bark, flowers, and seed pods are used as food items. … The fresh or dried leaves of the Moringa tree can be added to salads and are also used in the preparation of sauces, salsas and soups.

Properties

Several antioxidant plant compounds have been found in the leaves of Moringa oleifera (7, 8, 9). In addition to vitamin C and beta-carotene, these include (10, 11): Quercetin: This powerful antioxidant may help lower blood pressure (12, 13).

Did you know?

People say Moringa Tree is an Anti-Cancer Benefits. Not only is M. oleifera highly nutritious, but every single part of the tree has been used for beneficial purposes. In India, its leaves, bark, fruit, flowers, seeds and root are regularly used to make medicine, especially for anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor growth.

Nira (Garlic Chives)

Details

History

Garlic Chives is a species of onion native to southwestern parts of the Chinese province of Shanxi, and cultivated and naturalized elsewhere in Asia and around the world.

Culinary use

They can be used in stir-fry, tempura, stuffed into dumplings, and used in egg dishes.

Properties

Garlic chives have the nutritious benefits of being high in vitamins A, and C, fiber, carotene, riboflavin, thiamine, iron, calcium and potassium.

Did you know?

The nutrients in chives may offer a number of health benefits, including prevention of cancer and mood enhancement.

Opal Basil

Details

History

Opel Basil was first discovered in 1830 by George Bentham a British botanist. This variety was developed at the University of Connecticut in 1950. Opel basil grow for ornamental and culinary uses; it grows best in the summer heat.

Culinary use

Make a purple pesto or use the leaves as a garnish for desserts, salads, pizza and pastas. Opal Basil can replace green varieties in caprese salads and most other recipes calling for standard sweet basil. This purple basil can be used fresh or dry; it can also be frozen for future use.

Properties

Opel basil has vitamin K, manganese, copper, iron and vitamin A.

Did you know?

People say Opel basil contains the compounds eugenol and Rosmarinic acid, which increase the production of dopamine and serotonin in the brain helping to boost one’s mood.

ORCHIDS EDIBLE

Details

History

They have been used by many cultures in Africa, Asia, Australia, and the Americas for their medicinal values and edible quality.

Culinary Use

Food aficionados take their meals seriously, ingredients, nutritional attributes, the far sources. But most of all, they delight in the presentation. One aspect of culinary design that has been growing in popularity is the use of garnishes that artistically add to food dishes. The use of orchids garnishes in the U.S. dated back 50 years when Dendrobium. It has become its own industry. They are  the orchid garnish of choice, but culinary designers are increasingly looking to enhance their dishes. Turkey and the Middle East, they use orchid bulbs as flavoring in ice cream. People of South Africa use orchid tubers to flavor meat sauces.

Properties

Edible orchids have been ingested in a variety of forms for medicinal purposes for a very long time.

Did you know?

Orchids, particularly Dendrobium species, have been widely used in preparations of Japanese and Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of indigestion, headache, convulsions, and cancer.

Oregano

Details

History

Since oregano was originally grown in Greece, it was first used by the Greeks. They believed that this herb was created by the Goddess Aphrodite. … The word “oregano” comes from the Greek words ores, for “mountain,” and genos, for “joy” meaning “joy of the mountains”.

Culinary use

Oregano is a very flavorful herb that is often used in Italian, Greek and Spanish cooking. It is often used in seasoning blends, including Italian Seasoning, and pairs well with meats, tomato dishes, and eggs.

Properties

Oregano oil contains an essential compound called carvacrol, which has antimicrobial properties. The herb has shown antimicrobial activity in a number of studies.

Did you know?

People say its possible medicinal uses of oregano include treating respiratory tract disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, menstrual cramps, and urinary tract disorders. Applied topically, it may help treat a number of skin conditions, such as acne and dandruff.

Papalo

Details

History

The plant, is more popular in Bolivian and Puebla state in Mexico, is believed to have pre-dated Asian coriander that was brought to the Americans by Europeans. Its native range is from the south of Texas in North America down through Central and South America.

Culinary use

It is used to bend well with chiles, salsas, mushrooms, seafood. citrus flavors and more.

Properties

Papalo contains vitamin A, B and C. Vitamin A is important in vision, growth and development, skin health, immune function and reproduction.

Did you know?

It is used in many places as a remedy for treating various ailments. People in Mexico, Central and South America use this herb for high treating blood pressure, infections and stomach disorders. It helps in lowering blood pressure and also in treating liver disorders.

Pepper Mint

Details

History

Peppermint is a natural hybrid of water mint (Mentha Aquatica) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) and was first cultivated in England in the late seventeenth century. The herb has been used as a remedy for indigestion since Ancient Egyptian times.

Culinary use

Mint is often added to drinks to create an interesting flavor and for its health benefits. Mint, especially spearmint and peppermint, is used in tea because of its ability to ease upset stomachs. Mint can be added to water for its refreshing qualities, and it is added to alcoholic beverages such as mojitos.

Properties

Peppermint is a hybrid of water mint and spearmint. It is available in the forms of leaves, capsules, and oils. Peppermint has shown health benefits for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), nausea, skin conditions, headaches, cold, and flu.

Did you know?

People use pepper mint in a popular traditional remedy for a number of conditions. It is used to treat flatulence, menstrual pains, diarrhea, nausea, depression-related anxiety, muscle and nerve pain, the common cold, indigestion, and IBS.

Pipicha

Details

History

Pipicha is native to the states of Puebla and Oaxaca in southern Mexico, not too far from the Guatemalan border. Pipicha is not often seen outside of its native Mexico and some Central American countries, but it may be found at local Mexican markets and a few farmer’s markets.

Culinary use

Pipicha is commonly used in the Oaxacan dish Sopa de Guias, which is a zucchini soup made with the blossoms and the vines of the plant. Pipicha is typically added at the end of the cooking process, to maintain its flavor. Pipicha can add color and flavor to arroz blanco (white rice) and to lightly poached white fish.

Properties

Pipicha can act as a palate cleanser after meals. The herb contains vitamins C and B, as well as calcium and iron. The terpines found in the volatile oils of the Pipicha leaves are beta-myrcene and D-limonene and some others. These compounds act as antioxidants, helping to protect human cells from free-radicals and environmental toxins.

Did you know?

The native people in the area where Pipicha originated were called the Nahuatl. They utilized Pipicha as a medicinal herb for bacterial infections and detoxing the body, specifically the liver. The cuisine of Puebla and Oaxaca states in Mexico is heavily influenced by the local herb, and its popularity grows when natives leave the area and take Pipicha and its recipes along.

Rosemary

Details

History

Rosemary is an evergreen shrub and a member of the mint family. It has nothing to do with Mary or roses, instead deriving its name from the Latin “Rosmarinus.” which means “dew of the sea,” referring to its light blue flowers and affinity for wet environments.

Culinary use

Rosemary has is one of the most aromatic and pungent of all the herbs. Its needlelike leaves have pronounced lemon-pine flavor that pairs well with roasted lamb, garlic, and olive oil. Rosemary is also a nice addition to focaccia, tomato sauce, pizza, and pork, but because its flavor is strong, use a light hand.

Properties

Rosemary has iron, calcium, and vitamin B-6.  It has a range of possible health benefit. Rosemary is a rich source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which are thought to help boost the immune system and improve blood circulation.

Did you know?

People say the herb not only tastes good in culinary dishes, such as rosemary chicken and lamb, but it is also a good source of iron, calcium, and vitamin B-6. Rosemary was traditionally used to help alleviate muscle pain, improve memory, boost the immune and circulatory system, and promote hair growth.

Ruda (Rue Plant)

Details

History

Ruda graveolens, commonly known as rue, common rue or herb-of-grace, is a species of Ruda grown as an ornamental plant and herb. It is native to the Balkan Peninsula. It is now grown throughout the world in gardens, especially for its bluish leaves, and sometimes for its tolerance of hot and dry soil conditions.

Culinary use

Rue plant leaves have a strong, bitter taste, but they are edible. They’re typically used as a condiment to flavor various foods and as a tea. They may be used raw or dried for use as a seasoning.

Properties

Rue is valued for its flavonoids, particularly ruin, which strengthens blood vessels. Because of these flavonoids, rue has been used to strengthen the eyes, as an anthelmintic to treat parasitic worms, and as an antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant, hemostatic and stimulant.

Did you know?

People say not only is a great herb to add to meals (in small doses), but it has medicinal values and essential oils that are highly beneficial. The leaves emit a powerful odor, and although safe to consume in small amounts, it tastes very bitter.

Sage

Details

History

Sage Was Once Considered a Medicinal Cure-All. Sage, botanically-known as Salvia officinalis, is native to the Mediterranean region. Sages botanical name comes from the Latin word “salver,” meaning “to be saved.”

Culinary use

Dried sage is also perfectly fine to use when fresh isn’t available. To dry the leaves, just hang the sprigs upside-down in a dry place away from sunlight. North Americans most commonly associate sage with the spice used for turkey or pork stuffing’s.

Properties

Sage contains a variety of volatile oils, flavonoids (including apigenin, diosmetin, and luteolin), and phenolic acids, including the phenolic acid rosmarinic acid. Sage is a good source of vitamin K, vitamin B6, calcium, iron, manganese and fiber.

Did you know?

People say A combination of sage and rosemary is excellent for making your hair thicker, shinier and stronger. Sage is particularly effective in encouraging new hair growth as it improves circulation to the scalp, providing more nutrition to the hair follicles.

Savory

Details

History

Savory dates back to when the Romans used it as a replacement for salt and introduced it into northern Europe. Summer savory was sometimes referred to as the ‘herb of love’ and was used as a tonic for reinvigorating passion.

Culinary use

The leaves of winter savory are bright green, narrow, and tough. They are best used for dishes that require long cooking, such as stews, or added to the water when cooking dried beans so that there is enough heat and moisture to break them down.

Properties

Savory is a good source of Potassium, Zinc, and Copper, and very good source of Dietary Fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium and Manganese.

Did you know?

People say the leaves and stem are used to make medicine. People take summer savory for coughs, sore throat, and intestinal disorders including cramps, indigestion, gas, diarrhea, nausea, and loss of appetite. People with diabetes take it to relieve frequent thirst.

Shiso Leaves

Details

History

Shiso is a perennial Japanese plant that may be cultivated as an annual in temperature climates.

Culinary use

Shiso leaves are used to wrap sushi and as a garnish for sashimi. Leaves are deep-fried for tempura or snipped into salads. They can be pounded into pesto or made into tea. Red shiso leaves are often pickled and wrapped around umeboshi, pickled Japanese plums, to add flavor and color.

Properties

The plant produces the natural product perilloxin, which is built around a 3-benzoxepin moiety. Perilloxin inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase with an IC50 of 23.2 μM.[43] Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen also work by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase enzyme family

Did you know?

People say when the leaves of the red variety in particular are rubbed on the skin, they act as remarkable mosquito repellent: the insects seem to be discouraged by this highly aromatic fragrance. These flavonoids help protect the body’s nervous and circulatory system. It also contains anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties.

Sorrel

Details

History

Sorrel is native to Europe and western Asia where is grows wild and is also now grown in North America. Sorrel was used by the ancient Egyptians and its name stems from the old French word ‘surele’ which means ‘sour’.

Culinary use

Sorrel is delicious used as an herb or as a salad green — its tartness is really refreshing. A traditional way to enjoy sorrel is cooked into a sauce and served with fish, lending a lemony flavor without the use of lemon.

Properties

It contains a significant amount of fiber, small amount of protein. It is rich in vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B-6, iron, magnesium and a very significant level of potassium.

Did you know?

People say the significant levels of iron in sorrel boost the red blood cell production and prevent anemia (iron deficiency).

Tarragon

Details

History

The word tarragon is derived from the Latin dracunculus, ‘a little dragon’. Tarragon is thought to be a native of Siberia and Mongolia. The word tarragon additionally has ties to the French, Herbe au Dragon and references to “a little dragon”.

Culinary use

Though this herb is native to Siberia and western Asia, tarragon is primarily used in France. It’s often added to white wine vinegar, lending sweet, delicate licorice-like perfume and flavor. It pairs well with fish, omelets, and chicken cooked with mustard, and it’s a crucial component of béarnaise sauce.

Properties

Tarragon is an excellent source of minerals such as magnesium, iron, zinc, and calcium. The herb is rich in Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as B-6. Tarragon contains antioxidants that help to neutralize free radicals in the body.

Did you know?

People say drinking tarragon tea before bed can help with insomnia. Because of its calming affect tarragon can also help to relieve anxiety. Tarragon essential oil can help fight bad breath, as well as reduce body odor and microbes on the skin.

Thai Basil

Details

History

Thai Basil is a native to Southeast Asia and its believed to have originated in Thailand. Generally, any purple stemmed basil with a licorice flavor is considered to be ‘Thai basil’. This type of basil is a tender plant and does not survive in overly cold temperatures; it thrives in humid, tropical and sub-tropical environments.

Culinary use

Thai basil stands up to cooking a little better then sweet basil, making it a good choice for soups, stir-fries, and curries. It can also be eaten raw sprinkled over salads or cold noodles dishes and used interchangeably with sweet basils in most. This herb is popular cooking herb, especially in Southeast Asian cuisines.

Properties

This herb contains many vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A, C, and E, fiber, and antioxidants.

Did you know?

People say this herb has been primarily associated with treatment of inflammation inside or outside the body. It is used to cure the symptoms of arthritis as well as at the same time can treat issues connected with rheumatism.

Thyme

Details

History

This herb is not the same species as mother of thyme of wild thyme. Today the plant is common throughout North America, but it originated in the southern Mediterranean. Experts in language tell us that thyme’s name was derived from the Greek word thumus, or courage.

Culinary use

Cooking with Thyme. One of the many fresh herbs used in many Italian kitchens. The aromatic flavor of thyme complements Southern Italian sauces of hot peppers and eggplants, as well as being a primary herb in soups and stews.

Properties

This herb is low in sodium, and very low in cholesterol. It is also good source of vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), thiamin, magnesium, zinc, and copper, and a very good source of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, calcium, iron and manganese.

Did you know?

People say that thyme oil is used as a germ-killer in mouthwashes and liniments. It is also applied to the scalp to treat baldness and to the ears to fight bacterial and fungal infections. Thymol, one of the chemicals in thyme, is used with another chemical, chlorhexidine, as a dental varnish to prevent tooth decay.

Verdolaga

Details

History

It is now known by archaeologist that verdolaga is native to Texas. the Southwest US and Mexico.

Culinary Use

Fresh, raw leaves can be used as salad and as vegetable juice, tender leaves are used in salads. Sauteed and gently stewed stems and leaves served as a side dish with fish and poultry. It has been used in soup and curry preparations and eaten with rice and ragi cake in many mouthwatering purslane recipes in South Indian region, especially in part of former Mysore provinve of Karnataka state.

Properties

Purslane is also a rich source of vitamin C, and some B-complex vitamins like riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine and caretonoids, as well as dietary minerals, such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese.

Did you know?

Purslane seed oil has antioxidant and antiproliferative properties that help reduce oxidative stress.

Watercress

Details

History

Watercress enjoys a long and storied history, with ancient origins, a variety of uses, and evidence of its use dating back three millennia to the Persians, Greeks, and Romans. It also makes an appearance in iconic historical events, such as the very first Thanksgiving, where it was recorded as a menu item.

Culinary use

Toss into a Salad. The simplest way to prep watercress—and the way that allows its peppery green flavor to shine best—is to toss it into a salad. You can serve it on its own with a light dressing or toss it with other greens and veggies.

Properties

Manganese is a cofactor for the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and calcium for strong bones and teeth come in high doses when you eat watercress. Antioxidant flavonoids like ß carotene, zeaxanthin, and lutein protect from lung and mouth cancers.

Did you know?

People say as a card-carrying member of the cruciferous veggie family, watercress is an amazing source of eye-loving nutrients such as vitamin A and beta-carotene, and the carotenoids – lutein and zeaxanthin.

Wild Arugula

Details

History

Most variations on the name for Wild arugula can be traced back to the Latin word eruca, which means a certain type of cabbage. Wild arugula has been cultivated since the time of the Roman antiquity. Italians immigrating to America brought over rucola as a culinary herb and the term was Americanized as arugula. Known in Britain as wall rocket. Wild arugula is also referred to as Sylvetta.

Culinary use

Wild arugula as an herb or a salad green. It can be eaten raw wilted, or cooked; however, the flavor lessens when heated. It may also be used as an herb in soup, stews and sauces.

Properties

Wild Arugula is a nutrient rich small leafy green providing vitamin C, vitamin K, it  leaves contain adequate levels of minerals, especially copper and iron. Also, it has small amounts of some other essential minerals and electrolytes such as calcium, iron, potassium, manganese, and phosphorus.

Did you know?

People say Wild Arugula reduces the risk of cancer, improves eyesight and helps maintain healthy bones. Other major benefits of consuming Wild arugula include strengthening the brain, improving metabolic function, helping absorption of minerals in the body and boosting the immune system.